First Box/Open House

Phew…we made it!  On Thursday, May 24th we had our first open house and CSA pick up.  The weather was perfect; both the wind and temperature (which has been so strong and high lately) eased up.  In the early hours when Will and I harvested, it was overcast and there was a gentle rain.  It was perfect for harvesting, and it reminded me of being back in Washington and working in what seemed like everyday with wet muddy boots and rain gear on to keep you at least somewhat dry.

Here is Will bagging up some braising mix in the morning.

It was so nice to meet everybody and show them our farm, and talk a little bit about how Will and I handle the workload together here at 26th Street.  Some people are gardeners, some really love to cook, everybody had a unique perspective and it is just all very exciting.  Everybody was so kind and supportive; we feel very grateful to be where we are and doing what we are doing.  Thank you to everybody.  Everyday we learn more and more, and we are always trying to improve.

As of this point, we have only done harvesting for home use, so it was great for us to feel how a harvest morning will work, and how we will keep everything as fresh as possible until pick up at 4.  Our boxes seem to keep everything nice and cool.

Some boxes ready for pick up lined up in the shade.

The first box:

Pink Beauty Radishes, Kale, Swiss Chard, Baby Bok Choy, Head Lettuce, Braising Mix, Dill, and Cilantro.

Our goal as farmers is to provide both familiar items, and items that might be new.  We are offering recipe ideas with our newsletter to give people a head start into the vast amount of recipes available.

As we felt the braising mix was one of the most unfamiliar items, we included this recipe with this week’s box.  We have already seen that someone has tested it out!  Thanks to Mrs. Emily Dunbar for sharing the photo of her testing out the recipe with our braise mix.
(The eggs about to be poached)

This recipe called “Eggs in a Nest” is from “Animal Vegetable Miracle” by Camille Kingslover.

There is a large difference between store bought eggs, and eggs locally and or organically raised.  If you can buy eggs locally, we encourage you to do so.  You will notice a vast difference in flavor, and they are much more dense nutritionally.  We raise a small flock for home use on our farm, but as of now we don’t know of anyone personally that raises eggs organically for sale.  There are local eggs for sale at Back Alley Bakery though, and there will probably be some for sale at the farmer’s market in June. (It begins June 9th at Highland Park!)

1 medium onion, chopped
garlic to taste, chopped
carrots, chopped
½ cup sun dried tomatoes
braising mix, coarsely chopped
8 local or organic eggs
sea salt and pepper
cooked brown rice (optional)

Sauté onions and garlic in olive oil in a wide skillet until lightly golden

Add carrots and tomatoes and sauté for a few more minutes, adding just enough water to rehydrate the tomatoes.
Mix in greens and cover pan for a few minutes. Uncover, stir well, then use the back of a spoon to make depressions in the cooked leaves, circling the pan like numbers on a clock.
Break an egg into each depression, being careful to keep yolks whole. Cover pan again and allow eggs to poach for 3 to 5 minutes.
Remove from heat and serve over cooked brown rice. Add salt and pepper to taste.

If you had great success with a recipe this week, please share it with us!  Greens are the most nutritious vegetables out there. They are filled with vitamins C, B6, B1, B2, E, plus trace minerals such as manganese, copper, iron, and calcium!  Spring is all about greens, and we have a lot of them in the field now.

We are so glad to be finally starting up our CSA.  The weather has been super warm, and the weeds are popping up with the bugs, but we seem to have come out of the big hail storm we had two weeks ago alright and things sure look pretty bright.

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4 thoughts on “First Box/Open House

  1. Tracy G May 28, 2012 / 10:25 am

    Dan and I are so pleased with the quality and the quantity of the produce in the first box! Thank you for helping us eat so well this week. Here’s what we’ve been doing with it.

    • Bok choy:
    (1) cooked into Peanut Noodle Salad with Bok Choy (May 24 newsletter recipe)

    • Braising mix:
    (1) stir fried in sesame oil with onion, ginger, garlic, and tamari

    • Chard:
    (1) cooked into Beans ‘n’ Greens (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 57)

    • Cilantro:
    (1) chopped into bean salad
    (2) muddled into pineapple-vodka cocktails

    • Dill:
    (1) baked into Kale, Mushroom, and Dill Triangles (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 96)
    (2) dried in food dehydrator for future use as seasoning

    • Kale:
    (1) baked into Kale, Mushroom, and Dill Triangles (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 96)

    • Lettuce:
    (1) shredded into tossed salad

    • Radishes:
    (1) sliced into tossed salad
    (2) blanched and froze greens for future use in pesto

  2. Tracy G June 3, 2012 / 5:38 pm

    Thanks to the complimentary roadside bungee-cord assistance, our box made it safely home by bicycle! Here’s how we’ve enjoyed our veggies during week number two.

    • Broccoli:
    (1) dipped florets in Creamy Dill Sauce (see dill entry below)
    (2) steamed leaves to serve with Broiled Portabella Mushrooms (see spinach entry below)

    • Chard:
    (1) baked into Swiss Chard Pie (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 57)

    • Cilantro:
    (1) chopped and sprinkled into quesadillas
    (2) muddled into Bloody Mary cocktail
    (3) infused in vinegar for future use as salad dressing
    (4) infused in vodka for future use in cilantro-lime martinis

    • Dill:
    (1) blended into Creamy Dill Sauce (Arrowhead Mills Cookbook, p. 102)
    (2) dried in food dehydrator for future use as seasoning

    • Kale:
    (1) sautéed in Skillet Eggs with Kale and Soyrizo (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 97)

    • Lettuce:
    (1) shredded into tossed salad

    • Spinach:
    (1) shredded into tossed salad
    (2) steamed to serve with Broiled Portabella Mushrooms (Moosewood Restaurant Low-Fat Favorites, p. 322)

    • Radishes:
    (1) sliced into tossed salad
    (2) blanched and froze leafy tops for future use in soup

  3. Tracy G June 11, 2012 / 5:52 pm

    I’d like to post just one more, if only to illustrate how it’s completely doable to savor all of the produce in each weekly box. Dan and I are finding that the standard-sized allotment keeps two active adult vegetarians very happy for 4–5 days. It’d probably be 5–6 days, except I’ve been preserving a couple of items each week with the aim of extending the cheer into the winter months.

    • Beets
    (1) cooked and puréed into Chilled Beet and Buttermilk Soup (Moosewood Restaurant Low-Fat Favorites, p. 79)
    (2) sautéed greens in olive oil with garlic and balsamic vinegar
    (3) fed a little of the cooked root to our African grey parrot, a picky eater who normally rejects veggies, but he gave his rare stamp of approval to 26th Street Farm beets

    • Chard:
    (1) sautéed and baked into Swiss Chard Breakfast Burritos (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 59)

    • Cilantro:
    (1) chopped and stirred into bean salad
    (2) chopped and sprinkled over spinach enchiladas

    • Dill:
    (1) minced into Chilled Beet and Buttermilk Soup (Moosewood Restaurant Low-Fat Favorites, p. 79)
    (2) minced into Swiss Chard Breakfast Burritos (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 59)
    (3) infused in vinegar for future use in salad dressing

    • Kale:
    (1) sautéed and baked into Swiss Chard Breakfast Burritos (From Asparagus to Zucchini, 3rd ed., p. 59)
    (2) blanched, then dried in food dehydrator for future use in soup

    • Kohlrabi
    (1) chopped into tossed salad
    (2) sautéed greens in olive oil with garlic and balsamic vinegar

    • Lettuce:
    (1) shredded into tossed salad

    • Spinach:
    (1) steamed and baked into enchiladas

    • Turnips:
    (1) sliced into sticks and dipped into last of Creamy Dill Sauce

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